Morrison 1990 ZR-1 Speed Record: Aver 24-Hour 174.885-MPH! – VIDEO

It was a cold, windy, overcast, nasty in Texas on the day of the record run. The timed event started at 9:55:12am on March 1, 1990 with John Heinricy at the wheel of the ZR-1 and Tommy Morrison driving the L98. The pace was essentially flat-out! Heinricy said, “Speed was in the low 190s. We didn’t lift in the turns. We entered them foot on the floor and by the time we came out of it, we’d be in the high-170s. It didn’t slow down much in the turns.” Fuel stops only took about 45-seconds to fill the 48-gallon fuel cell. Interestingly, the chassis and tires weren’t really stressed that much by the low cornering loads – something that would have been an issue at one of the high-banked tracks. Read More


C7 Grand Sport Corvette, Best Street Vette Ever?

Some are describing the new Grand Sport as a “Z06 with a Stingray engine.” Chief engineer Tadge Juechter explained that the Grand Sport package is not simply a “plug’n play” with Z06 parts. While the Z06 parts work great on the new Grand Sport, the basic Stingray is unique and everything had to be calibrated. The Grand Sport has its own springs, anti-roll bars, Magnetic Ride Control, and Electronically-controlled rear differential programming. The Z06 wide-body offers plenty of extra venting and opens up the fenders for the extra-wide wheels and tires. Read More


C4 Grand Sport Coupe & Convertible On Block at Mecum Anaheim – TWO VIDEOS

A 1996 Grand Sport Coupe cost around $40,000 and the convertible went for around $48,000. So, how are these cars holding up in the market? A Grand Sport Coupe and Convertible went on the block at the Mecum Anaheim Auction on November 14, 2015. Bidding on both cars did not hit the reserve. This generally means that the sellers are asking more than the market will bear. The Coupe stalled out at $35,000 and the low volume Convertible (only 180 made) stalled at $37,500. Read More

Dave MacDonald Inducted Into National Corvette Museum Hall of Fame

Auto racing legend Dave MacDonald was inducted into The National Corvette Museum Hall of Fame on August 28, 2014, in Bowling Green, Kentucky. MacDonald’s induction took place 50 years after the extremely talented young driver was tragically killed in his rookie race at the 1964 Indy 500 that also claimed the life of driver Eddie Sachs. After the race, an investigation determined that there was, “No driver error.” Read More