NEW!!! “America’s “Old Glory” Sports Car” Corvette Prints Series

After numerous prototype layouts I settled in on “America’s “Old Glory” Sports Car”. The first one was kind of easy, but once layout completed, I knew I had a ton of work ahead of me. What started out as a fairly simple idea turned into my Project for 2017! And now, it is ready to present.

As of this announcement, we have “America’s Old Glory” art print layouts of every year Corvette from 1953 to 2017. Soon I will be adding the 2018 Corvette, as well as the upcoming ZR1 and Mid-Engine C8 Corvette when it is released next year.

Each print measures 11×17 and is printed in full-color on mat-finished heavy card stock, and signed and numbered by yours truly. Every print is shrink wrapped on 12×18 cardboard so that your print arrives flat and clean. Price – just $24.95, plus $6.95 for USPS Priority Mail shipping. Read More


Rollie Walriven’s Daytona Blue 1963 Split-Window Coupe

The beautifully restored car you see here is “the” car Rollie bought in November 1962. Aside from a few accessory parts, everything on the car today was there from the factory. We should consider this car as a personalized, restored, one-owner survivor car. There’s something you don’t see every day! From November 1962 to 1968 while Rollie was working for an industrial valve company, his 1963 Corvette was his daily driver that proved to a very dependable car. Sometimes the car even served as the tow car while Rollie was racing his 1957 Corvette. Read More

1963 Corvette – The First Production Sting Ray

The first 1963 Corvette Sting Ray, The original American Idol – I call the Corvette the “The American Automotive Horatio Alger Story.” It’s the ultimate automotive rags-to-riches story. You could also call it an automotive Cinderella story. While the C6 has taken more flack than it deserves, it’s good to look back to the very beginning to get a really clear picture of how far the Corvette has come in 60 years. Today, new designs are market researched, but in the ‘50s, it was a seat-of-the-pants approach, driven by men with strong personalities. “Father” of the Corvette, Harley Earl, was the director of GM’s “Art and Color Section.” from 1927 to 1958. His successor, William L. Mitchell picked up the mantle and drove the Corvette where Earl never imagined. Read More

Vette Shows: The Sights of C2 Corvettes at the 2011 30th Corvettes at Carlisle Show

Yesterday we showed you some of the C3 Shark Corvettes from the 2011 Corvettes at Carlisle Show. We attended on friday and it was a good thing because I read on keith Cornett’s CorvetteBlogger.com that overcast skies on Saturday have vendors packing by noon time. Hurricanes seldom blow up the east coast the way that Irene did, what’a shame it had to be that weekend.

While the 1965 Mako Shark II show car was a total game-changer for Corvette styling, back then no one was saying, “Gee, don’t you think the Sting Ray is looking a little tired?” NEVER HAPPENED. I’ve often wondered what the Corvette would look like today had the shark styling had not happened and the Sting Ray design was allowed to develop and mature, the same way the 911 Porsche did over the years. Today’s 911 Porsche still has the basic look from when the car first arrived as a 1965 model. Read More

1965 396 L78 Corvette – The First Big-Block Corvette

Were it not for NASCAR Chevys trailing behind nearly everyone in the early ’60s, there may never have been a big-block Corvette. Fuelie Corvettes were doing very sell in SCCA sports car racing, but the NASCAR Chevys where in trouble. While GM was officially not racing in the late ’50s and early ’60s, Duntov and a few other Chevy engineers kept select Chevy racers supplied heavy-duty specialty parts for field testing. Read More