History/News/Commentary from K. Scott Teeters

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Corvette History

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1955 Chevrolet Corvette Ready to Race Now at Just 95,000


republished from WindingRoad.com

Location: Bellflower, CA

Chassis # VE555001196

This particular chassis has no racing history. We restored it from a basket case to commemorate the famous EX87/5951 Corvette which set the 150+ mph speed record at Daytona Beach in January 1956. It is presented as closely as possible to the paint scheme and configuration of that milestone car in Corvette History. Continue reading

9-27-52 – General Motors officially begins using the name “Corvette” for its new sports car

Three and one half months before the 1953 GM Motorama at the Waldorf Astoria, GM officially begins to use the word “Corvette” for its new 2-seater sports car. – Videos

Timeline: 9.27.15 – Last month we told you about Chevrolet PR-man Myron “Scotty” Scott’s induction into the National Corvette Museum’s Hall of Fame. Mr. Scott was the man responsible for coming up with the name “Corvette” for Harley Earl’s “American sports car” show car concept. The working name for the two-seater had been “Opel.” How uninspiring! (Hey Man! Did you see the new Op?”) Over 300 names were rejected before Myron Scott found the word, “Corvette” in the dictionary. I wonder if a copy of that list is still around.

“By the books” the American flag, in its entirety, is not supposed to be used for anything but the American flag, and thus cannot be used as part of a logo or trademark. This “rule of the flag” is pretty much ignored these days, but back in 1952, GM’s lawyers nixed Harley Earl’s first Corvette logo design because Earl wanted to use the American flag. (How cool would that have been?!) Continue reading

Corvette Timeline Tales: 9-26-91 – Callaway Engineering completes its 500th Twin-Turbo Corvette conversion

Callaway Engineering completes its 500th Twin-Turbo Corvette conversion – Videos


Dateline: 9-26-15: Callaway Cars did something that no other outside vendor had ever done before or since for the Corvette line. From 1987 to 1991 Chevrolet offered, on the official Corvette order form, RPO B2K – Callaway Twin Turbo (not GM installed). RPO B2K started as a $19,995 option on top of the ’87 Corvette’s base price of $27,999, making it the most expensive option ever offered on a Corvette – a record that stood until the arrival of the $27,016, 1990 RPO ZR-1 option. The twin-turbocharged L98 engine was initially rated at 345-horsepower, up from the stock L98’s 240-horsepower. By 1991 the Callaway twin-turbo was rated at 403-horsepower.

The first Callaway Twin Turbo Corvettes sported twin NACA ducts on the hood and unique lightweight wheels. Later versions had full body kits designed by Paul Deutschman Continue reading

John Greenwood Retrospective: A Corvette Legend Passes by K. Scott Teeters


On July 7, 2015, the Corvette community lost another legend; John Greenwood passed.

Words and Art by K. Scott Teeters as written for Vette Magazine, republished from SuperChevy.com

Illustrated Corvette Series No. 223

On July 7, 2015, the Corvette community lost another legend; John Greenwood passed. He was 70 years old. John was a member of a very small club of legendary Corvette figures that only needed one name, such that when you said that one name, it spoke volumes. Just a few others are: Shinoda, Lingenfelter, Callaway, Yenko, Guldstrand, and of course, Duntov. Engage any serious Corvette person in some bench racing, drop the name Greenwood and instantaneously all manner of mental images come to mind: suspension packages, C4 body kits, BFGoodrich Stars and Stripes, 427 ZL1 racers, and the most outrageous Corvette racers ever, the C3 widebody “Batmobile” Greenwood IMSA cars. Continue reading

1978 Corvette History & Art Prints Video Catalog by K. Scott Teeters.

The late ‘70s were indeed “strange dayz” for the Corvette.
 Art, Article and Video production by Scott Teeters

In the late seventies, founding Fathers had all been put out to pasture. Harley Earl was long gone, Ed Cole made his exit in September 1974, Duntov was gone from GM in January 1975, and Bill Mitchell took exit, “stage left” in July 1977. Without angels in the boardroom, what would become of the Corvette?

Fortunately, the afterglow of the work of the Founding Fathers had tremendous momentum, despite power cuts, weight increases, and 100-percent price increase since 1967. The ’77 Corvette set an, all-time-high sale record of 49,213 units. When the ’78 Corvette was introduced on October 6, 1977, the press and public were surprised to see a very handsome facelift – the return of the fastback. Continue reading

Desiring the 1963 Corvette Sting Ray and Other Beautiful “Objects” Back When…


BY PAUL NIEDERMEYER as republished from CurbsideClassic.com

1963 Corvette Sting Ray: Ravishing New “Lust” Object Appears Out Of The Depths Of The Ocean for Sixties Era Pre-Teenager

If you were ten or so like me in 1963, these two were likely the most memorable (good) things that happened that year–provided you either had the the kind of parents who’d let you see Dr. No or had an older accomplice willing to sneak you in via the fire escape door in the alley. All of which was still easier than seeing a new ’63 Sting Ray in the flesh, at least in Iowa City. Of course, once one had finally arrived at the dealer I could actually run my hands over it, check out its innards and even slip right inside it. Ursula Undress-ing would have to stay in the realm of imagination. Continue reading

Ever Wonder About the Grand Sport Corvette History?

Grand Sport History

by Staff as originally published in Corvette Online.  History by John Heinricy

We recently attended the C4 Gathering at the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Aside from the opportunity to check out the Skydome progress and see the great new displays, we had the opportunity to sit in on a few presentations.

One such session was conducted by John Heinricy and Jim Minneker. He also happens to own C4 Grand Sport serial No. 1, but we will touch on that a bit later. Heinricy had some awesome first-hand information, and even told a few stories that few people have ever heard about his experiences working for GM. Continue reading

1953 NASCAR Racer that Saved the Corvette


Photos courtesy Terry Michaelis.

by Jim Donnelly as republished from Hemmings Daily Blog

A lot of car people, and especially a lot of people who like Chevrolet, know the basic framework of the story. The Corvette started out as a show car during the Motorama shows presented by General Motors and made it to production on the cheap. Snail-like sales of the hallowed originals – just 300 in 1953 – nearly led to the car being dropped. Folklore has Zora Arkus-Duntov delivering an over-my-dead-body ultimatum that kept the Corvette alive. The real story is more complicated and compelling. It involves a very special early Corvette that predicted its future remaking as a true sports car with V-8 power. The car is also being extensively shown at some of the country’s most prestigious car shows.

It’s in the collection of Pro Team Corvette, the dealer and restorer of classic Corvettes based in Napoleon, Ohio. We’ve been in touch with Pro Team president Terry Michaelis, who has not only been generous with information on Corvette number 211, but is also asking the Hemmings Nation for help on researching its racing history. But first, let’s look at the car. Continue reading

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