Keith Busse Corvette Pace Car Collection Sells for $1,760,000!!! – VIDEO

Here’s something you don’t see every day. Keith Busse has a fascination with Corvette Pace Car. He bought his first Corvette Pace Car in the early 1980s, obviously a 1978 Corvette Pace Car. Then he got a 1986 Corvette Pace Car and just kept going.

Up until 1998 Chevrolet offered Corvette Pace Car replicas in limited quantities, so if you could afford the premium and acted quickly, you could own a Corvette Pace Car, minus the actual track hardware that typically included strobe lights and safety equipment. Corvette Pace Cars never needed any extra power enhancements because the basic car was more that capable of handling its task. Read More


What’s New In Vette Vues Magazine! 8/15

The cover story for the August issue of Vette Vues is “Victory At Le Mans!” There’s an old saying in road racing that goes, “If you win the 12 Hours at Sebring or the 24 Hours at Daytona, all of America will know. But if you win the 24 Hours At le Mans, the WHOLE WORLD will know. The Corvette Racing Team scored their eighth Le Mans win since the debut arrival of the C5-R cars in 1999. BRAVISSIMO! Corvette Racing Team! Read More

Vette Videos: Hot Lap Action With the 2012 Indy 500 ZR1 Corvette Pace Car

What’s really interesting about the ‘12 Indy 500 ZR1 Pace Car is that it is the most powerful car to ever pace the 500. Time was that the actual Indy race cars didn’t have 638-horsepower and topping speeds of over 200-mph was mind boggling! Fast forward to today, and we have a mass-produced automobile with all the creature comforts imaginable, packing 638-horsepower that you can live with, that’ll do 205-mph, AND has a governor on the car so that its speed will not exceed the body’s aerodynamic stability. At least, that’s what Chevrolet says about the 205-mph limiter. Read More

The Very Rare, Non-Replica Corvette Indy 500 Pace Cars

Indy 500 pace cars have become a specialty nitch all by themselves. That’s why in 1978 when it was announced by Chevrolet that a special version of the 25th Anniversary Corvette would pace the ‘78 Indy 500 and that replicas would be available, the news ignited the Corvette community, sparking a speculation mania, the likes of which Chevrolet never anticipated. Although a very nice car, for many reasons, the ‘78 Corvette Pace Car never became a hot collectible. Many can be purchased for not a lot of money.

One interesting tidbit about the Corvette Indy Pace Cars is that unlike many of the previous “enhanced” production car-based pace cars, the stock Corvette was more than up to the challenge and only required the mandated safety equipment. A C5 Corvette paced the 500 for the ‘98 race and another pace car replica package was offered. Read More

Vette Polls: Vote For Your Favorite Special Edition Corvette

Since we’re talking about special edition Corvettes in general, I thought it would be fun to find out from you, our readers, what’s your favorite special edition Corvette, as presented above, Pace Car Corvettes included. Since 21 cars is an awfully large spread (like an Italian presidential election), I broke down the polling into C3, C4, C5, and C6 special editions. Pictures of each candidate are below in each sectioned out poll. Read More

1995 Indy 500 Corvette Pace Car – The First “Designer” Indy 500 Corvette

By the time the ‘95 Corvette Indy Pace Car arrived, it was obvious that management let the designers have at it. These cars have to be seen in the daylight to be appreciated. The dark purple metallic paint on the upper portion looks like a lollipop. I don’t know the designer that came up with this design, but BRAVO! Since ‘95 Corvette Indy 500 Pace Cars have been, shall we say, brash, with the exception of the silver & black ‘08 Indy 500 Corvette Pace Car, which was a salute to the first 1978 Indy 500 Corvette Pace Car. Read More

Corvette Pace Car Files: 1986 Indy 500 Pace Car Corvette

The second piece of big news for ‘86 was that a Corvette would pace the Indy 500 for the second time. Retired general Chuck Yeager was enjoying celebrity status as a result of the book and movie, “The Right Stuff.” But Chevrolet was still smarting from the heavy criticism over the ‘78 Corvette Pace Car debacle and seemed to go in the opposite direction. Rather than producing a set number of pace car relicas, ALL ‘86 Corvette convertibles were designated as a “Pace Car Replica” and came with dealer or customer applied decals for the doors. Many said, “Why bother.” Read More